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Vintage Watch Straps

Straps and bands for fixed wire lug vintage military trench or officers Great War wristwatches.



Contents
1932 Omega Marine
Louis Alix
1937 Omega Naïd
1939 Marine Standard
Frédéric Baumgartner
Omega W.W.W. Wristwatches
Omega and Tissot

Omega

Copyright © Notice

Omega was founded as an assembly workshop in La Chaux-de-Fonds in 1848 by the 23 year old Louis Brandt. Louis Brandt died in 1897 and his sons Louis-Paul and César moved the firm to Bienne, operating there as Louis Brandt & Fils (Louis Brandt & Sons) until in 1891 the name was changed to Louis Brandt & Frère (Louis Brandt & Brother).

In 1894 a completely new 19 ligneA ligne, pronounced line, is 1/12 of an old French inch (27.07mm), which itself is 1.0657 of an English inch. So a ligne is 2.256mm. pocket watch movement was introduced which proved extremely successful. Its salient points were the simplicity of its construction, and the interchangability of its parts which were made by ground breaking new automated production processes. The company's banker, Henri Rieckel, suggested the name "Omega" for the new watch.

The new calibre won a gold medal at the 1896 Swiss National Exhibition in Geneva and made Omega the principal watchmaker in Switzerland, both technically and numerically. The overwhelming success of watches bearing the Omega name led to it being adopted as the sole name used for watches by the company from 1903.


SA: Selling Agency, London

Omega watches imported into London after 1 June 1907, when British law required that all imported watches be assayed and stamped with special import hallmarks, usually (often? always? I'm not sure) carry the sponsor's mark SA in a diamond shield. The letters SA stand for Selling Agency and this mark was registered in London on 20 September 1907 by Dimier Brothers, import agents and watch makers of 46 Cannon St. London.

Omega are well known for making watches and sports timing equipment, but in the next section I look at two Omega watches that are not so well known. One that was the first "dive watch" and another with an unusual waterproof case.

If you have any corrections, questions, suggestions, or comments, then please drop me a line at Please don't give out my email address, refer anyone interested to this web site. I try to answer all emails I receive so if you don't get a reply in a few days please check your junk or spam folders.


Photo by Mike Katz, © www.clockfixer.com

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The 1932 Omega Marine - Reference 679

In 1932, with Rolex still having a firm grip on waterproof watch crowns through the patented screw down Rolex Oyster crown, Omega introduced a waterproof wristwatch based upon Swiss patent CH 146310 granted to Louis Alix of Geneva. This patent was also taken out in France, Britain, the USA and Germany. The design overcame the problem of making the winding stem water proof without infringing Rolex's patents by the simple expedient of sliding the whole watch inside a second outer casing. The watch was called the Omega Marine, Omega reference 679. This watch was mostly produced in steel with the prefix CK, so CK 679, but also in precious metals e.g. OJ 679 (OJ = Or Jeune, yellow gold).


Louis Alix patent CH 146310

The Omega Marine watch movement, dial, and hands were contained in a rectangular section interior case. This interior case had a shoulder at the end with a groove which contained a gasket. The interior case slid into a rectangular section outer case, the end of which contacted the gasket in the shoulder of the interior case, forming a water tight seal. A large spring clip on the back of the outer case held the two parts of the case together. The clip was necessary to provide the initial seal between the inner case, the gasket, and the outer case, but as the watch was submerged, the air pressure inside the case would remain constant while the water pressure outside the watch increased, pressing the two parts of the case more firmly together, increasing the force on the gasket and making the seal more water tight.

In his patent, Louis Alix suggests that the gasket, the item labelled "q" in the figure, should be made of rubber (" caoutchouc"). In the book OMEGA - A Journey through Time1 this gasket is said to be leather, which I rather doubt because leather is not a very satisfactory gasket material and I don't think it would serve very well in this application.

Louis Alix's design for the case, shown in the figure from the patent, was for the case to have a curved shape of an arc of a circle. He doesn't explain why: it may have been to follow the shape of the wrist, or it may have been a purely aesthetic consideration, this was the age of Art Deco after all. I don't think this curved shape was actually ever produced, all the pictures of Omega Marines which I have seen (I have never been lucky enough to actually handle one) have been straight. The elegant curved shape envisaged by Alix would have been extremely difficult to make.


Photo by Mike Katz, © www.clockfixer.com

The patent illustrated a slim crown recessed into a depression on the side of the interior case, but this was not very practical and production models had the crown at the top of the movement, at the 12 o'clock position like a pocket watch. This can be seen in the second of the two pictures here, kindly provided to me by Mike Katz.

The Marine was at first fitted with the manual winding stem wind and set calibre 19.4 T1, created in 1930, then later with the improved 19.4 T2, created in 1935, still a manual winding movement. Omega was rather unusual at the time in referring to their calibres in millimetres rather than ligne sizes, and 19.4 means these movements were 19.4 mm diameter. They were round movements, not shaped to the form of the watchcase. The 19.4 T1 and T2 calibers were available with either 15 or 17 jewels and operated at 18,000 vibrations per hour. Although the Marine would have been an ideal candidate for an automatic winding movement, Omega did not introduce their ?rst automatic movements until 1943, with the bumper automatic 28.10 and 30.10 calibers, and the Marine was never fitted with an automatic movement.

The outer case had a sapphire crystal in the front so that the dial of the watch in the interior case could be seen. Sapphire was chosen because it was much stronger than glass. I don't know how the joint between the sapphire crystal and the outer case was sealed. The watch strap was made of seal skin, which was thought to be more resistant to water than ordinary leather

Omega advertised the Marine watch as the first divers watch. In 1936 one of these watches was sunk to a depth of 73 metres in Lake Geneva for 30 minutes. In May 1937 the Swiss Laboratory for Horology in Neuchâtel certified the Omega Marine as being able to withstand a pressure of 13.5 atmospheres, equivalent to a depth of water of 135 metres. The information on these tests seems to have only been made public, or at least relatively widely known, in 2007 with the publication of the book "Omega, a Journey Through Time"1. I would be interested to know if anyone has any advertising or other literature from the 1930s showing exactly what Omega did claim for the Marine.

The Omega Marine was worn and endorsed by Dr William Beebe, the American naturalist and explorer who took up underwater exploration in the late 1920s, and Commander Yves Le Prieur, a French Naval Officer and pioneer of self-contained underwater breathing apparatus.

Dr Beebe is probably most famous for his 1934 descent in the "Bathysphere" to a depth of 3,028 feet beneath the ocean surface. But Beebe was also a pioneer of helmet diving from 1925, and in 1936 he made a helmet dive in the Pacific wearing an Omega Marine. Afterwards he wrote "I wore my Omega Marine in the Pacific Ocean at a depth of 14 metres, where the pressure is twice the normal one. My watch sustained this test with success. Its tightness to water and dust and its robustness to corrosion represent a true progress for watchmaking science."

In 1924 Commander Prieur of the French Navy invented a hand-controlled self-contained underwater breathing apparatus or aqualung, which for the first time allowed a diver to swim free without any connection to the surface. He went on to create a second version with an automatic pressure reducer which was adopted by the French Navy in 1936. In the 1957 book "The Silent World"2 by Captain Jacques-Yves Cousteau and Frédéric Dumas there is a picture of Prieur, dating probaly to the 1940s, diving with his aqualung and wearing an Omega Marine.

A longer version of this description of the 1932 Omega Marine and 1939 Omega Marine Standard was published in the NAWCC Watch & Clock Bulletin, February 2012.

I don't know how many of the Omega Marine were actually made, but because it was not an automatic it would have to be manually wound every day. To wind the watch or set the hands obviously meant removing the inner case from the outer. In addition to being a nuisance, this would have made the sliding surfaces wear quickly, and imposed wear and tear on the sealing gasket. The Omega Marine would also have been an expensive watch to make, and hence expensive to buy. I would have guessed that this, together with the inconvenience of its design in daily use, would have restricted its popularity to those who really needed a fully waterproof watch, which is why it is scarce and valuable today.

However, in A Journey Through Time1, numerous examples of the Marine are illustrated in mixtures of steel and gold, as well as 18 carat gold versions retailed by Tiffany and Cartier in New York. The case design naturally lent itself to the art-deco style in vogue at the time, and Marine's with art-deco dials and strap lugs were produced. Obviously these precious metal cases and art-deco design features weren't necessary in a diver's watch, and are in stark contract to the strictly functional steel cases and easy to read dials of today's diver's watches. It would seem that, just as today, watches with unusual technical features attracted the attention of those who like something different, perhaps because they like impressive gadgets, or to impress their friends, and the Omega Marine sold to many people who wouldn't dream of diving deeper than their local swimming pool.

In 2007 Omega added a reproduction of this watch, the Marine 1932, to its Museum Collection of vintage timepieces. The double case was made in contrasting 18-carat red and white gold, and the series was limited to 135 pieces to commemorate the 1937 official certification of the watch's water resistance to a depth of 135 metres.

The watch in Mike Katz's pictures is actually a version of the Marine produced by Omega's sister company Tissot. It is branded "Omega Watch Co. Tissot" in the case back and on the movement. Paul Brandt began the process of bringing Omega and Tissot together in 1925, and by 1930 Paul Tissot-Daguette was managing director of Omega as well as a director of Tissot. The two companies became subsidiaries of a multi-national holding organisation, Société Suisse pour l'Industrie Horlogére (SSIH) to produce a complete range of watches, and for joint sales promotions.

References

1: OMEGA - A Journey through Time; by Marco Richon (Curator of the Omega Museum). Published 2007 by Omega Ltd., Bienne Switzerland. ISBN 978-2-9700562-2-5

2. The Silent World (subtitle: A story of undersea discovery and adventure, by the first men to swim at record depths with the freedom of fish) 1953. Co-authored by Captain Jacques-Yves Cousteau and Frédéric Dumas and edited by James Dugan.

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Louis Alix

So who was Louis Alix, the designer of the Omega Marine waterproof case? There seems to be very little known about him. He is recorded in his patents as "Louis Alix of 1 Rue du Commerce, Geneva, Switzerland, a citizen of the French Republic."

The registration announcement for patent CH 146310 shown here appeared in the 30th May 1931 edition of La Fédération Horlogère Suisse. It records Alix's occupation as sertisseur-joaillier, which means jewel setter. Whether this is setting jewels for jewellery or for watch movement bearings is not clear, and I have not been able to establish which this means, or whether there would be a difference between the two terms. I find it easier to believe that a person involved in the manufacture of watches in the 1930s would be interested in designing one of the first waterproof cases, and more difficult to understand how someone setting decorative jewels would be interested in such a technical rather than aesthetic matter, but I really don't know the answer.

I have found four Swiss patents granted to Louis Alix between 1930 and 1941. The first one is the patent for the Omega Marine case, CH 146310, with a prority/registration date of 10th March 1930 and a publication/grant date of 15th April 1931. This patent was also granted in France as 710316, Britain as 365356, USA as 1907700 and Germany as 567213. The French patent reference is always shown with the letters "S.G.D.G" which stand for "Sans Garantie du Gouvernement" or "Without Government Guarantee", the French Government for some reason, while being happy to grant exclusive rights to the inventor, also being careful not to imply any guarantee that the thing will actually work!

Alix's second patent, number CH 160827 was published on 31st March 1933. It was for a spring loaded "bouton de manchette", or cufflink. I find it difficult to think of a watchmaker being interested in designing improved cufflinks, so maybe this does point towards him being more of a jeweller than a watch maker.

His third patent, number CH 204295 "Remontoir de montre étanche" (Crown for a waterproof watch) published 30th April 1939 returns to watchmaking. It is a design of screw down crown for a waterproof watch which appears to be intended to circumvent the Rolex Oyster screw down crown patent. It is absurdly complicated and inelegant, and I am confident just from looking at it that it was never actually used.

The fourth patent, number CH 223807 published 15th October 1942 was titled "Procédé de fabrication de montres et montre obtenue suivant ce procédé" (Method of manufacturing watches and watches produced by this method.) This patent was for making watch cases, or parts of watche cases, from aluminium because of its corrosion resistance and ability to be coloured by anodising. The claims are extremely general in nature and I am surprised that a patent was granted just on the idea that aluminium could be used to make a watch case. However, as aluminium watch cases are very thin on the ground, even I would say almost non-existant, I think it is safe to say that this patent was also not a great success.

So that is all I have discovered about Louis Alix to date. He was a jewel setter, probably in the jewellery rather than the watch trade, and an amateur inventor. The curved shape he proposed for the watch case would have been very difficult and expensive to make, and indicates that he was not engaged in watch case manufacturing, or he would have designed something more practical.

Alix must have hit it lucky with the design of the Omega Marine case at just the time Omega were on the look out for a waterproof case to catch up with, or even get ahead of, Rolex. The design of the Marine case was not even all that original, because cases where the whole watch was contained inside a waterproof outer case had been granted to Jean Finger and Frederick Gruen in the 1920s, and Rolex had even produced a watch called the Rolex Hermetic using the Jean Finger patent. But Alix got his patent because his rectangular sliding case was novel, Omega spotted it and snapped up the rights, and the rest, as they say, is history.

Omega Naiad
Omega Naïad

The 1937 Omega Naïad

Omega's first "standard" waterproof wristwatch was the 1937 Naïad. In Greek Mythology Naïads were nymphs who lived in and presided over brooks, springs, and fountains. The Omega Naïad had a snap on waterproof case back and a waterproof crown that sealed against the stem tube on the side of the case. The Naïad pictured here has a movement serial number just below 9 million, which would place it in about 1938.

Omega Naiad
Omega Naïad case back

The case back carries the words "Waterproof" and "Mod. Depose", which means "Registered Design". The crown is quite slim and unlike the later model Naïad crowns described below, but must use a similar sealing method against the stem tube to make the watch waterproof.

The movement is an Omega 23.4SC. This manual wound 15 jewel Omega movement runs at 18,000 vph and has a bimetallic compensation balance and Breguet hairspring. The 23.4SC movement is 23.4mm diameter, and the SC designation shows that it has a centre seconds, which in this movement is driven indirectly. The calibre 23.4 was a great success for Omega. Designed in 1935 and introduced in 1936, the 23.4 was the first Omega calibre with centre sweep seconds. Used in the Omega Medicus, it was manufactured until 1953.

Later Naïad Crowns

Early Omega Seamaster 300s used Naïad waterproof crowns. Rather than the screw down design of the Rolex Oyster, this Naïad crown used a "sealing pack" in the crown which sealed against the stem tube. The sealing pack was designed so that at atmospheric pressure it was compressed lightly against the stem tube, but as the pressure increased the sealing pack was compressed tighter onto the stem tube. The deeper the watch was submerged, the greater the water pressure and the tighter the crown sealed. The picture here from an Omega advert is the best that I have found so far, and the details are not very good, if you have a better one, please let me know.

Omega Naiad crown
Omega advert detail of Naïad crown

The design of the Naïad crown was sound in theory, and worked well in practice until the sealing pack aged and lost its elasticity. When this happened the seal against the stem tube was no longer enough to keep out water if the watch was submerged a small distance. Because of this a story grew up that the Naïad crown actually required the presence of signigicant water pressure to make it seal, and that at shallow depths, when pressure was not as great, water could seep past the seals. However, a moments thought will reveal that this cannot possibly be true; you can't get to great depths without passing through shallow depths, and if the crown leaked at shallow depts then the watch would take in enought water to ruin it (which is a very small amoumnt) before the crown sealed. No watch like this could be sold, at least not in the quatities and over the many years that Omega sold watches with Naïad crowns, so I am sure that this story is wrong. However, old Naïad crowns shouldn't be assumed to be watertight.

The eventual replacement of Naïad crown on watches like the Omega Seamaster was most likely purely to appeal to public perception; the Rolex Sea Dweller had a screw down crown, which Rolex made a lot of in advertising, so it is likely that the Seamaster also acquired a screw down crown in order to compete for sales. The screw down crown has the benefit that it does not depend on any elastomers that could perish with age for sealing. Its drawbacks are that it needs to be unscrewed to wind the watch, and that until recently screw down crowns do not seal when unscrewed. These problems were overcome by the introduction of automatic winding, and elastomer seals that maintain a seal when the crown is unscrewed - but these can still perish.

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Photo Jeff Chiang © www.oldwatch.club.tw

The 1939 Omega Marine Standard

In 1939 Omega introduced another rectangular waterproof watch called the Marine Standard. This watch had a simpler case than the 1932 Omega Marine, presumably to make it cheaper to make, and it also had the crown on the ouside of the case so that it was easy to wind every day and set the hands to the correct time. The Omega reference number for this watch was CK 3635, and it contained an Omega calibre T17 movement.


Crystal sealing gasket detail

Waterproofing was achieved by rubber gaskets for the crystal and in the case back, which sealed the joint between the case back and the middle part of the case containing the movement. The case back was held in place by two very distinctive clips. I don't know how the winding stem was made waterproof, it must have had a gland of some kind, but I don't know what material this was made from, or details of its design and how it was fitted. The case of the Omega Marine Standard was designed by Frédéric Baumgartner, a Geneva based case maker.

Frédéric Baumgartner obtained three patents on the design of this case. The first, CH 215449 was registered on the 28th of August 1940 and concerned a method of sealing the joint between the crystal and the case. The second patent, CH 216460 was also registered on the 28th of August 1940 and concerned a design of clip back case. The third, CH 220263 was registered on 30th June 1941, and reflected another design of clip back case.

The first patent CH 215449 shows how the joint between the crystal and the case can be sealed by a rubber gasket. The crystal and gasket are fitted from inside the case before the movement goes in. The figure from the patent shows how the rectangular plastic crystal 3 was moulded with an annular groove 4 with a lower shoulder 5 and an upper shoulder 6. A sealing ring or gasket 7 rests on the shoulder 5. The bezel presents an annular projection 8 which enters the groove 4 of the crystal, and the upper edge of the groove 4 in the crystal engages over the shoulder 6 of the bezel, while the lower shoulder 5 of the crystal presses the sealing ring against the bezel. To mount the crystal and sealing ring in the bezel, they are simply pushed upwards until the projection 8 of the bezel clips into the groove 4 in the crystal, holding the crystal and gasket in place.


Photo Jeff Chiang © www.oldwatch.club.tw

The second and third patents, CH 216460 and CH 220263 concern the design of the case. In CH 216460 the crystal is mounted in the same way as in patent CH 215449, simply clipped into place from inside the case. However, the next patent, CH 220263 shows the crystal inserted into the bezel from the front, but does not indicate any method of sealing. I don't think this method of mounting the crystal was used in any of the rectangular clip back Baumgarner cases.

Both patents CH 216460 and CH 220263 show an inner case which is open at the back, and is enclosed in an outer case with two hinged clips. The case back is separate and has a groove around its outer edge which carries a gasket. When the case is assembled, the two clips on the outer case hold the case back against the inner case, and a seal is made between the inner case and the gasket in the case back. The difference bewtween the two patents is that the first, CH 216460, shows the inner case welded to the outer case whereas the second, CH 220263, shows the inner case as a sliding fit into the outer case.

The design which was actually used for the Omega Marine Standard was a mixture of the designs shown in the patents. The inner case was separate from the outer case, as shown in patent CH 220263 and as can be seen in the photographs kindly provided to me by Jeff Chiang. The crystal was fitted to this inner case from inside, clipping into the bezel and securing the gasket as shown in patents CH 215449 and CH 216460. To assemble the watch, first the crystal and gasket were clipped into the inner case. Then the movement and dial were inserted into the inner case and the crown and winding stem inserted and fixed in place. The inner case was then placed inside the outer case, and the case back with gasket offered up. Finally the two clips were sprung into place in grooves in the case back, holding the case back and gasket firmly against the inner case, and holding the inner case inside the outer case.

Although increasing water pressure would press the case back harder onto the gasket, increasing the seal, it would have the opposite effect of pressing the crystal into the case and reducing the pressure on its gasket, thus weakening the seal. The seal between the crystal and the inner case was hence the weakest part of the design, and limited its water resistance to 10 metres.

I have not been able to find a patent for the method of sealing the winding stem where it enters the case. This was not a problem for the 1932 Omega Marine, because the crown and stem were completely contained within the outer case and therefore no seal was required for the winding stem. But on the Omega Marine Standard, the crown is on the outside of the case, and therefore the opening in the side of the case which the winding stem passes through must be sealed somehow. I have no idea how this was achieved, it wasn't by a screw down crown as in the Rolex Oyster, so must have had some sort of gasket or gland. If you know the details, please get in touch.

The clips holding the back in place are very distinctive, enabling recognition of this case design from just a view of the back of the case. You can see the clips in one of the pictures, and in the figure from the patent. Although the outer case and inner case look as though they were forged, they must have been very precisely made or machined, because the clips work to hold the whole assembly together just on the small amount of " spring" available from the case back gasket.

I have never seen an Omega Marine Standard with the Baumgartner patents marked on it. There is usually a list of the patents for the Louis Alix patented design of the 1932 Omega Marine described above in the case back. This may have been because Baumgartner was a bit slow in getting his patents registered in 1940 and 1941, some time after the Marine Standard was actually introduced in 1939, and the Louis Alix patent numbers were stamped into the cases to provide some vague warning that the design was patented before that was actually the case. I can't think of any other reason, because the two designs are totally different.

Baumgartner also supplied cases Tissot for a Tissot version of the Omega Marine Standard, at least some of which were called " Aquasport". The cases of these Tissot versions of the Marine Standard which I have examined are obviously an evolutionary development of the Omega Marine Standard design.

In the Tissot version of the Marine Standard that I have seen, there is no separate loose inner case carrying the crystal. There is instead what looks like a friction fit inner case that traps the crystal and a gasket between it and the outer case. On the Tissot which I have, I not been able to remove the inner case from the outer case, and think these inner cases may have been press fitted together at the factory, in which case a damaged crystal would probably need a trip back to the factory to be replaced. One of the benefits of this modification is that the clamping force of the clips on the back compresses the crystal gasket as well as the case back gasket, which is an improvement over the design of the Omega Marine Standard.

In addition to Omega and Tissot, Baumgartner supplied these clip back cases to Jaeger LeCoultre, Movado, Longines, and possibly others. Watches in these cases are also seen marked Bravingtons, a renowned jewellers in Kings Cross, London, who retailed watches under their own name. If you have any information on any of these other makes, please get in touch.

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Frédéric Baumgartner

An interesting question is why Frédéric Baumgartner with apparently no previous history of making waterproof cases should suddenly produce one, and it appears, only one. Before trying to answer this question, we should look for evidence that this was in fact Frédéric Baumgartner's first and/or only foray into the field of waterproof watch cases.

I have found 8 Swiss patents granted to Frédéric Baumgartner of Geneva starting with a 1928 patent for the design of a protective case for a pocket watch similar to the Movado Ermeto. This case is to protect a watch against knocks by other items being carried in the same pocket or purse, and there is no provision for making it waterproof. A UK version of this patent gives Baumgartner's address as 13 Coulouvrenière, Geneva. Apart from the three patents for the clip back case used for the Omega Marine Standard, registered in 1940 - 1941, none of the other patents concern waterproof watch cases.

NumberPriority dateTitleSubject
CH2202631941-06-30Boîte de montre étancheThird waterproof watch patent.
CH2164601940-08-28Boîte de montre-braceletSecond waterproof watch patent.
CH2154491940-08-28Boîte de montre étancheFirst waterproof watch patent.
CH2055901938-05-09Montre-braceletMethod of attaching strap to watch case.
CH1871661935-11-11Montre-braceletMethod of attaching strap to watch case.
CH1480311929-09-23Pièce d'horlogerieFlip open case for a small clock.
CH1386461929-09-23Pièce d'horlogerieFlip open case for a small clock.
CH1357931928-12-01MontreProtective case for pocket watch.

From the evidence of these patents, the three patents granted for the design of the rectangular clip back case used for the Omega Marine Standard were Frédéric Baumgartner's only patents concernig waterproof watch cases.

1939 Baumgartner Advert
1939 Baumgartner Advertisement
1939 Taubert Ad
1939 Taubert Advertisement

This quarter page advert is from the 1939 edition of La Classification Horlogère des Calibres de Montres et des Fournitures d'Horlogerie Susisses by AF Jobin. The advert says that Frédéric Baumgartner are a Manufacturer of Jewellery-Watches (Manufacture de Bijoux-Montres) and that they make watch cases in gold, platinum and staybrite stainless steel, and of very fine quality (Qualite tres soignee).

There is no mention of waterproof watch cases in the Baumgartner advert, even though it was created shortly before the Omega Marine Standard was launched. Contrast the Baumgartner advert with the full page advert from Taubert & Fils, also a Geneva watch case maker, but this time one specialising in waterproof watch cases. The watch in the Taubert advert is not exactly strapped around the submarine, more draped across it. But the meaning is clear, the watch is being dashed by waves but is not harmed by them, and just in case it is any doubt, the headline drives the point home "The waterproof watch par excellence". To me these two adverts are clearly from companies specialising in different areas: Baumgartner in jewellery watches of very neat quality, Taubert in waterproof watches.

So why did Frédéric Baumgartner suddenly start making waterproof cases, and then after producing one successful design, equally suddenly stop? Perhaps the imputus to make a waterproof case was fashion. After Rolex launched the waterproof Oyster in 1926 the idea took off rapidly, and in the 1930s every watch maker wanted to have a waterprood model in their range. Perhaps Baumgartner found that the difficulties of maintaining the high production standards required to guarantee that every case was waterproof meant the exercise wasn't profitable for them, and just gave up after the height of the fashion had passed.

Patek Philippe case back
Patek Philippe case back

Members of the Swiss union of watch case makers mark cases made of precious metal with a stamp, or Poinçin de Maître (Punch of the Master) consisting of a symbol called a collective responsibility mark, and a unique number which is assigned to each maker. The mark shown here is an 18 carat gold Patek Philippe case back and consistes of a small Geneva key with the number 2 on the lever. Thanks to TimeZone member candle7 for permission to use the image, and for the information that the watch is a 1962 Patek Philippe ref. 3434. It is not a waterproof watch.

The collective responsibility mark of the Geneva key and number 2 was registered to F. Baumgartner SA of Geneva, and the Classification Horlogere Suisse confirms that F. Baumgartner SA of Geneva, case maker, was Frédéric Baumgartner.

Frédéric Baumgartner's registered Poinçin de Maître was cancelled on 4 May 1973, so the firm must have been trading up until around that date, but there were no more patents granted to them for waterproof cases. They could have produced waterproof cases of different designs which were not patented. After the patenting frenzy of the 1920s and 1930s, many of the basic features needed for a waterproof case, screw down crown, screw back etc. came off patent and could be copied by anyone, so they could have made screw back cases with screw down crowns without a patent. The only way to tell will be to look for Baumgartner's Poinçin de Maître of a Geneva key with the number 2 on its lever in a gold or platinum case. If you have a watch with a waterproof case from the 1930s or 1940s or later in gold or platinum, please look out for this tiny mark inside the case back and if you find one, please let me know!

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Omega WWW wristwatch ref. CK 2444

Omega WWW Wristwatches

Beginning in 1945 Omega supplied wristwatches to the British military under the "Watch Wristlet Waterproof" (W.W.W.) military specification, which replaced the Army Trade Pattern (ATP) specification wristwatch used in WW2. The picture shows one of these watches on one of my leather NATO G10 straps, which I think looks more "period" than the nylon straps these watches are usually fitted with.

The dial and case back carry the pheon (broad arrow) denoting British military property, and the case back also carries the W.W.W. initials. The dial is matt black with recessed small seconds at 6 o'clock, minute track with luminous dots, white Arabic numerals and sword hands with luminous radium based paint. The steel case is water resistant and entirely satin brushed to reduce reflections. The lugs have fixed (soldered) bars for security. The movement is a calibre 30 T2, which Omega say had special adjustment in four positions to within ten seconds per day as for a chronometer. A total of 25,000 watches were supplied by Omega to this specification.

The original version of the W.W.W. specification did not require shock protection for the balance and none of the wristwatches supplied under it had shock protection. A provision requiring shock protection appears to have been introduced as part of the amendment to the W.W.W. specification in 1947.

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Tissot

Charles Tissot & Son, Le Locle, Geneve, La Chaux de Fonds, was founded in 1853 as Charles F. Tissotby by Charles Félicien Tissot-Daguette with his son Charles Emile Tissot-Daguette. They developed a strong market in Russia but this was lost due to the Russian revolution in 1917. Tissot produced their first wristwatch in 1900. There were close family connections between Tissot and Omega.

Omega and Tissot

After the stock market crash of 1929 and the subsequent financial crisis, the market for watches collapsed in Europe. In 1930 Paul Tissot-Daguette was Managing Director of Omega, and Tissot and Omega formed a joint marketing organisation, Société Suisse pour l'Industrie Horlogére (SSIH) so that between them they could produce a complete range of watches but maintain separate companies.

The Omega and Tissot factories produced movements for both brands, the Omega factory specialising in more complex movements, such as some automatic self winding movements, and Tissot the simpler movements. Where essentially the same movements were produced in both factories, most parts are interchangable. But there are usually some differences between Omega and Tissot variants to prevent swapping movements between brands by watchmakers. Usually the dimensions were sightly different, but as Tissot tended more to the medium price range, some Tissot details were cheaper, such as Omega using a Breguet overcoil balance spring whereas the Tissot counterpart would have a flat spring.

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